Pharma Program
Acne, rosacea, fungal conditions and MRSA are common problems facing today’s dermatologists.
A summary of Helix BioMedix Drug Discovery and Development Programs focusing on the Company’s initial candidates in the areas of anti-infective, anti-fungal and MRSA fighting peptides based on the innate immune system…click to learn more.
We are developing a novel, broad-spectrum, topical anti-infective for the treatment of skin and wound infections and the prevention of Staphylococcus aureus. Our pre-clinical data have shown that our lead molecules are capable of treating Trichophyton infections and hold great promise for multiple dermatological indications…click to learn more.
Our pre-clinical data have shown that our lead molecules are capable of treating Trichophyton infections and hold great promise for multiple dermatological indications…click to learn more.
Acne, rosacea, fungal conditions and MRSA are common problems facing today’s dermatologists…click to learn more.

Dermatological Conditions

Safe, effective and consumer acceptable pharmaceutical products are highly sought-after solutions for dermatological concerns.  Helix BioMedix innovation continues to bring the best in new drug candidates for these dermatological conditions and life-saving intervention for serious infections.


Acne

Acne is a common problem in adolescents and young adults. The disorder is caused by abnormal desquamation of follicular epithelium that results in obstruction of the pilosebaceous canal. This obstruction leads to the formation of comedones, which can become inflamed because of overgrowth of P.acnes. Such inflammation is caused by a number of elements including, the formation of free fatty acids from the breakdown of triglycerides by P.acnes, the pro-inflammatory surface components of P.acnes and the pro-inflammatory surface components of P.acnes released when the bacterium is killed.


MRSA

There is an ever-increasing global problem of antimicrobial resistance. This phenomenon has been well documented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which recently identified a 28.5% increase in S. aureus oxacillin (methicillin) resistance in hospitals taking part in the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance system from 1992-2003. Their report concludes that action is necessary to control the spread of this organism, and, to this end, several European countries have been successful in identifying and treating colonized patients quickly. The ability of lipohexapeptides to safely and effectively kill S. aureus in an abraded skin infection model, and the fact that this class of molecule exhibits potent activity against both methicillin and mupirocin (current therapy) resistant strains, support its development potential. The broad spectrum of activity exhibited by lipohexapeptides also enables possible application to chronic wounds, burn wounds, and trauma wounds in which multiple pathogens can cause significant morbidity and mortality. The market for such topical anti-infectives is currently estimated to be $1.5 billion per year.